Best Practices – Kids

Please think twice about bringing your small child to the dog park.

It can be a scary and dangerous place for a child, even one who is generally comfortable with dogs.

Remember that the park is primarily a place for dogs to do dog things off-leash. That means run, herd, sniff, etc.

If you do decide to bring your kids,

1. Keep them close and

2. Never let them run

For some helpful tips about bringing kids to dog parks, see
http://www.hillsborodogs.com/park/kidsatdogpark.html

Dog Park Tip – Watch your dog

Tip 3: Watch your dog

It can be tempting to lose yourself in conversation or your phone when your dog is contained in an off-leash park. Don’t.

phone

For the safety and well-being of your dog and others’, make sure you know what your dog is up to at all times.

Photographer’s note: all subjects featured in the dog park tips are willing volunteers.

Dog Park Best Practices

Tip 2: Unleash

Remove your dog’s leash–assuming it is safe* to do so–before entering the main park.

leashedpearl_crop

A dog on a leash is disadvantaged when first meeting and greeting the unleashed park dogs.

*You should remove your dog’s leash in the front vestibule separating the street from the main park IF both gates are closed and there is no danger of your dog escaping.

Dog Park Best Practices

Tip 1: Don’t Crowd the Gate

Keep your dog from crowding the park entrance when new visitors are coming through the gate.

Gate Crowding

Dog park entrances can often be conflict zones. By preventing pack behavior at the gate, you can help to

  • Reduce territorial behavior (dog park dogs ‘protecting their turf’ from newcomers)
  • Reduce likelihood of the new dogs feeling threatened¬†(some dogs behave more aggressively when they feel threatened)
  • Give incoming dogs room to get their bearings and meet the park dogs in a less confrontational way